Contact OMI
Phone: (505) 272-3053
Fax: (505) 925-0546
General e-mail | Records requests

Mailing Address:
MSC07 4040
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Physical Address:
1101 Camino de Salud NE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Map and directions

Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday

Natalie L. Adolphi, PHD

Natalie L. Adolphi, PHD

Natalie L. Adolphi, PHD

Natalie L. Adolphi has served as Director of the Center for Forensic Imaging since 2017, and was elected Vice-Chair of the International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging in 2018. She holds an M.S. in Medical Physics (2013) from the University of New Mexico and a Ph.D. in Physics (1995) from Washington University in St. Louis, where she developed expertise in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to a variety of systems. Currently, as a faculty member at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, her research is focused on two areas: 1) the development and application of advanced imaging methods (MRI and CT) for medicolegal death investigation, and 2) biomedical applications of nanotechnology, including magnetic particles for therapeutic applications and methods for improving the targeting of nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy. Other recent research projects include SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) relaxometry methods for detecting targeted magnetic nanoparticles in vivo, targeted magnetic nanoparticles for MRI detection of cancer, microcoil NMR methods for in vitro detection of magnetic particles, and novel MRI techniques for pulmonary imaging. Dr. Adolphi has experience in both the academic and small business research settings, having worked as a consultant or contractor for several small for-profit companies, including Senior Scientific, LLC and ABQMR, Inc. (both in Albuquerque, NM). Before joining the UNM Health Sciences faculty, Dr. Adolphi was a Research Scientist (2003-2008) at New Mexico Resonance, a small, non-profit research company in Albuquerque. From 1995-2003, she was a member of the physics faculty at Knox College, where her NSF-funded research program was focused on the characterization of metal-hydrogen systems using Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) spectroscopy and other NMR methods.